Interactive Activities


NEW Adventure! Meet Bridget Moore

New! Interactive Video

After taking your class through the Moore Family Story lesson, consider how a 19th-century Irish immigrant family kept their traditions alive through treasured personal objects from the point of view of Bridget Moore.

A Tenement Museum costumed interpreter plays Bridget, a real woman who immigrated to the United States from Ireland in 1863 in the aftermath of the Irish potato famine. Explore her new home and learn about how she feels connected to her Irish culture through real artifacts with personal meaning.

This “choose-your-own-adventure” style interactive video for grades 3 – 12 works great as a comprehension and connection review exercise to our Meet Bridget virtual field trip!



Navigate Bridget’s story through object-based questions, or explore by individual chapters using the bookmarks 🔖

 

To view this interactive activity on its own separate page, visit the shareable link below.

Bridget’s story shows us how objects can give us strength during times of change, can soothe us, can remind us of our loved ones. Bridget and her family stay connected to her past and her heritage through the personal objects kept in their home – each artifact has a special meaning.

Discover more stories with your class through Objects of Comfort, a curated collection featuring student contributions to our Your Story, Our Story project.

Associated Family Story Article

Middle School: 6-8th Grade, Upper Elementary: 4-5th Grade

The Moore Family Story

Learn about the Moores, an Irish American family who lived in 97 Orchard Street in the 1860s.

Read More

Associated Virtual Field Trip

1860’s Meet Bridget | On the Meet Bridget program, students will go back in time to 1869 to learn from an actor playing Bridget Moore. Bridget Moore was a real woman who immigrated to the United States from Ireland in 1863.  A Tenement Museum educator will teach students about the push and pull factors impacting 19th-century Irish immigrants.

  • Themes: Culture and Identity, Push and Pull Factors, Complicating Stereotypes
  • Potential focus: European immigration, Irish Potato Famine

Questions on lessons and activities?

The materials on this page can enrich a visit to the Museum or help you teach about immigration. If you have questions or comments, please e-mail us.

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