Theme: Complicating Stereotypes | Grades 3 – 5

Complicating Stereotypes     Students learn about history of untrue narratives about different groups of people, understand how immigrants and migrants build structures of support to combat stereotypes, and hear human stories that foster connection.

1860’s Meet Bridget 

On the Meet Bridget program, students will go back in time to 1869 to learn from an actor playing Bridget Moore. Bridget Moore was a real woman who immigrated to the United States from Ireland in 1863.  A Tenement Museum educator will teach students about push and pull factors impacting 19th century Irish immigrants, with a focus on the Potato Famine. By analyzing historical newspaper images, maps, and photographs students will hypothesize about Bridget Moore’s life in New York City. They then have will watch a video of Bridget presenting her 1869 home.  Through the objects in Bridget’s home, students will learn about daily tasks, how her family connects to their Irish culture, and how she finds comfort in her new home.  Finally, students will reflect on personal objects that represent culture, connection, and comfort for them.

Themes: Complicating Stereotypes, Culture and Identity, Push and Pull Factors

Topics: European Immigration

Duration: 60 minutes

Connections to Our Curriculum:

 


1930s Baldizzi Family

The Baldizzi Family story features an Italian-American family and their 1935 tenement home. Students will learn about the push and pull factors and immigration regulations impacting their immigration journey to the United States. Through guided exploration of the recreated apartment, oral histories, and historic documents and photographs, students will consider how the family created a home in a time of crisis: the Great Depression. Students will learn about the places in the neighborhood, city, and government where the Baldizzi’s could turn for help. Students will make past to present connections to consider where people go for support today.

Themes: Complicating Stereotypes, Push and Pull Factors

Topics: European Immigration

Duration: 60 minutes

Connections to our Curriculum:

 


1916 Meet Victoria

Meet Victoria is a costumed interpretation program.  Students will be transported back in time to 1916 to interact with an actor playing Victoria Confino, an actual 14-year-old girl who immigrated to the United States through Ellis Island in 1913.  Victoria will show students her home and daily life, tell stories about her life experiences, and share how her family keeps their culture alive through food, language, holiday celebrations, and more.  Students will explore the differences and similarities between life in and today while exploring how people cope when they move to a new place and are uncertain about the future—an experience as relevant today as it was in 1916.  Throughout the program, students will engage with Victoria through questions and connection making.

Themes: Complicating Stereotypes, Culture and Identity

Topics: European Immigration

Duration: 60 minutes

Connections to our Curriculum:

 


1950’s Epstein Family

The Epstein Family story features a Jewish American family and their 1950’s tenement home.  Rivka and Kalman Epstein were Holocaust survivors and students will learn about their journey from Europe to find protection and safety in the United States.  By exploring their recreated home and the objects in it, students uncover how the family revived traditions from their home and also started new ones. Through oral histories and videos with the daughter in the family, Bella Epstein, students learn how she found support, friendship, and discovery in an increasingly diverse Lower East Side neighborhood. Students will consider how they themselves form their own senses of identity and belonging.

Themes: Complicating Stereotypes, Culture and Identity, Push and Pull Factors, European Immigration

Topics: European Immigration

Duration: 60 minutes 

Connections to our Curriculum: 

 


1970’s Wong Family   

The Wong family story features a Chinese American family and their 1970’s tenement home. Students learn about the push and pull factors of Chinese immigration and the long history of laws that restricted Asian immigration. Through exploration of a recreated apartment and garment shop, students will examine how the Wongs made a home in a growing Chinatown. Video interviews and family and neighborhood photographs will allow students to consider how different generations of the family navigate language, schooling, media, and work leading students to consider how they themselves form their own senses of identity and belonging.

 Themes: Complicating Stereotypes, Culture and Identity, Industrialization and Labor, Push and Pull Factors

Topics: Asian Immigration    

Duration: 60 minutes 

Connections to our Curriculum: 

 

Teaching Resources

We offer teacher-designed, teacher-tested lesson plans where students learn to interpret objects, oral histories, and primary sources while making modern connections. Find unit plans, lesson plans, primary sources, and non-fiction family stories, made for flexible use in your classroom.

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