Shared Journeys

Our Shared Journeys Program connects immigrant language learners to the experiences of newcomers in New York history. Now offered virtually on Zoom, our interactive workshops provide a unique context for English language learning, help students place their own immigration experience within a broader historical and political framework, and promote critical engagement with civic issues. Each virtual workshop includes a “visit” to a restored tenement apartment at 97 or 103 Orchard Street, and uses the Zoom chat and audio features to discuss connections between im/migrant experiences, past and present.  


Timing

Workshops for adults are 90-minutes and workshops for middle school and high school students are 60 minutes. 

Booking and Reservations

Reservations are required for all Shared Journeys groups and must be made at least 2 weeks in advance. Available slots fill up quickly, so please contact us as far in advance as possible and have alternate dates available. To make reservations, please complete this inquiry form or e-mail [email protected] 

Fees

Tenement Museum offers Shared Journeys workshops to New York City ESOL classes free of charge. Shared Journeys is made possible through generous support from the National Park Service and public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council. 

Current Program Offerings


Coming to the United States

Rosaria and Adolpho Baldizzi came to the United States as the first widespread restrictions on immigration were enforced. Participants will visit their 1935 apartment and compare their own immigration experience with that of the Baldizzis, discussing the negotiation of policies and regulations and what it means to be “American.” 

Making a Living

In 1897, the Levine family ran a small garment factory in their home. Factories like this one sparked a national debate about acceptable working conditions. Participants will learn about how past immigrants made a living and organized for better working conditions, and make comparisons to working conditions today.